What’s a Merry Christmas Without a Warm Furnace?

Monday, December 17th, 2018

santa-oliveI love this time of year—when I can go running into snow banks, muzzle first, and everybody wants to snap pictures of it and share it online. Let me tell you folks, if you’ve never gotten to be a dog for Christmas, I highly recommend it! You get a fur coat and people want to put Santa hats on you and shower you with attention.

Now I know you can’t actually get to be a dog for a season—and you don’t really need to have a thick coat of fur when you’re indoors because you have a furnace to keep the holidays merry and bright and warm. A furnace isn’t exactly a festive item. After all, nobody puts tinsel and other decorations on their furnace. (And they absolutely shouldn’t! This can create a fire hazard.) But if you lost the use of your furnace during the holidays, you wouldn’t have much of a merry Christmas. Not when your home is as cold as old Scrooge’s place!

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A Thanksgiving Reminder and Some Furnace Health Tips

Monday, November 19th, 2018

fall-cornucopiaOlive here getting in early on wishing you a happy Thanksgiving—and also reminding you to check out a holiday safety post about Thanksgiving food and your pets I wrote last year. The short version: Don’t use your pets like a garbage disposal after Thanksgiving feasting! Not all of those leftovers are healthy for dogs and cats, and many can be downright dangerous. Stuffing, the seasoning on turkey skin, grapes, artificial sweeteners, meat bones, and any kind of chocolate are all out of the question. Please help make this season a happy one for your household and your pets with this simple guide.

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Wow, My Furnace Is Noisy! Is That a Problem?

Tuesday, January 2nd, 2018

woman-shocked-by-loud-noise“A sound so high-pitched, only dogs can hear it.” You’ve probably heard this phrase before, and it’s true that we dogs have a much better sense of hearing than humans. We can hear four times as far as you and hear high-pitched sounds between a range of 67,000 to 45,000 Hz. By comparison, you humans can hear in the range of 64,000 to 23,000 Hz. We also have a bunch of extra ear muscles so we can track sound direction.

But despite all our great hearing, we can’t actually tell you about noise problems in your furnace. It’s something you’ll have to figure out yourself. When your furnace begins to make odd noises that are a racket to your less sensitive human ears, you’ll probably wonder if you’ve got trouble that needs professional furnace repair in Knoxville, TN.

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Furnace Noises that Should Disturb You

Tuesday, April 11th, 2017
woman-shocked-by-loud-noise

Yes, you humans jump at loud noises too!

Like almost all dogs (and cats as well), I suffer from a condition called brontophobia. No, it’s not a fear of Brontosauruses—although it does come from the same Greek root word meaning “thunder.” Betcha didn’t expect Ol’ Olive here to be up on her classical language, right? Well, as I like to say, Amicus hominis canis! Which means a dog is a man’s best friend, and I’m sorry but I couldn’t find anything better with an Internet search.

Anyway, the point is brontophobia means “fear of loud noises.” It’s an important defense from danger if you’re a dog or a cat. But it works for you humans as well! And it especially works when it comes to a home furnace. Noises from a furnace you don’t expect to hear are often warnings the heating system isn’t working the way it should and need repairs. So without further ado, here is my list of furnace noises you don’t want to hear!

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That “Booming” Sound from Your Furnace: Here’s What It Means

Tuesday, November 17th, 2015

Do you know what brontophobia means? I recently looked it up, because I heard a veterinarian use it. It means “fear of thunder and loud noises,” and it’s common among most animals—especially dogs and cats. I know that whenever I heard a sharp noise, like a car backfiring, I jump and get nervous. Now there’s nothing really to be afraid of in that case… but then my hearing is much more sensitive than yours, and so to me car backfire can sound like an epic explosion in action movie.

But noises can provide important warnings to your human ears. A good example is the noises that come from gas furnaces. Yes, furnaces make noise whenever they run, but I mean those out-of-the-ordinary noises that might suddenly catch you off guard and make your dog (or cat) jump. One of these unusual sounds is a ­booming noise.

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